Submit an abstract: 2017 ASLO Meeting - Bridging the eco-evolutionary gap

We invite you to submit an abstract to 

Session 044 - Bridging the eco-evolutionary gap: Plastic and adaptive responses to climate change

at the 2017 ASLO Aquatic Science Meeting in Honolulu (Hawaii; 26 Feb – 03 Mar).

Abstracts are due 14 October 2016.  

Here's a description of the session:

Climate change is affecting ecological processes and biogeochemical cycles of marine environments. Species respond to climate change through both phenotypic plasticity and microevolutionary adaptations. For example, across many trophic levels, species quickly respond to change is by shifting their distribution in space (e.g. population distribution) or time (e.g. reproductive events). However, there are limits to these types of responses, imposed by the presence of the limiting requirements of different critical stages in a species? life history. These limitations are linked to a species? life history strategy, with further response of the species beyond this point moving from phenotypic plasticity to genetic adaptation. There is unfortunately a chasm between phenotypic plasticity and evolutionary adaptations in the literature of marine species response to climate change. In this session we invite studies on species? response to environmental change, using both niche-based (e.g., climate-envelope models) and genetic (e.g., evolutionary models) approaches. Through this theme session we intend to develop awareness among scientists and build capacity to merge these two realities by including more evolutionary thinking in niche-based approaches and more ecological thinking in studies of species evolutionary processes. This understanding is necessary as we develop models to project species adaptability to future climate scenarios.

Posted on October 10, 2016 .

Neuheimer Lab MSc defence - Congrats Chantel!

On 15 July 2016, lab member Chantel Chang successfully defended her Oceanography MSc thesis entitled "The Influence of Biophysical Factors on the Connectivity of Holoplanktonic Copepods".  It was a wonderful celebration of all Chantel's hard work and excellent contributions to our lab and department.  Congratulations Chantel!

Before! - photo by J. Wong-Ala

Before! - photo by J. Wong-Ala

Thesis cake! - Photo by J. Wong-Ala

Thesis cake! - Photo by J. Wong-Ala

Jenn & Chantel, MSc - photo by J. Wong-Ala

Jenn & Chantel, MSc - photo by J. Wong-Ala

Anna & Chantel, MSc.

Anna & Chantel, MSc.

Posted on July 16, 2016 .

New Article: Adult and offspring size in the ocean data paper

Our data paper, Adult and offspring size in the ocean: A database of size metrics and conversion factors, is posted as an Accepted Article over at Ecology.  The database contains adult and offspring size estimates (and associated conversion factors) for marine species covering >17 orders of magnitude in body mass.  The work is a collaboration with the Centre for Ocean Life and accompanies our papers:

Andersen, K.H., T. Berge, R.J. Gonçalves, M. Hartvig, J. Heuschele, S. Hylander, N.S. Jacobsen, C. Lindemann, E.A. Martens, A.B. Neuheimer*, K. Olsson, A. Palacz, F. Prowe, J. Sainmont, S.J. Traving, A.W. Visser, N. Wadhwa, and T. Kiørboe. 2016. Characteristic Sizes of Life in the Oceans, from Bacteria to Whales. Annual Review of Marine Science. 8:3.1-3.25. (pdf)

Neuheimer, A.B.*, M. Hartvig, J. Heuschele, S. Hylander, T. Kiørboe, K.H. Olsson, J. Sainmont, and K.H. Andersen. 2015. Adult and offspring size in the ocean over 17 orders of magnitude follows two life history strategies. Ecology 96:3303–3311. (link, pdf)




Posted on March 9, 2016 .

Neuheimer Lab @ the 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting, New Orleans

Lab member Jennifer Wong-Ala will be presenting our work on larval reef fish connectivity this week at the 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting in New Orleans.  The work is in collaboration with the Hixon and Powell labs here at UH (details below).  Much thanks to ASLOMP for awarding Jennifer with a travel grant to attend the conference.  Congratulations and safe travels, Jenn!

ME14D-0640: The Influence of Life History Variability on Population Connectivity: Development and Application of a Trait-Based Biophysical Model of Individuals

J. Wong-Ala, A.B. Neuheimer, M. Hixon & B. Powell

Connectivity estimates, which measure the exchange of individuals among populations, are necessary to create effective reserves for marine life. Connectivity can be influenced by a combination of biology (e.g. spawning time) and physics (e.g. currents). In the past a dispersal model was created in an effort to explain connectivity for the highly sought after reef fish Lau‘ipala (Yellow Tang, Zebrasoma flavescens) around Hawai‘i Island using physics alone, but this was shown to be insufficient. Here we created an individual based model (IBM) to describe Lau‘ipala life history and behavior forced with ocean currents and temperature (via coupling to a physical model) to examine biophysical interactions. The IBM allows for tracking of individual fish from spawning to settlement, and individual variability in modeled processes. We first examined the influence of different reproductive (e.g. batch vs. constant spawners), developmental (e.g. pelagic larval duration), and behavioral (e.g. active vs. passive buoyancy control) traits on modeled connectivity estimates for larval reef fish around Hawai‘i Island and compared results to genetic observations of parent-offspring pair distribution. Our model is trait-based which allows individuals to vary in life history strategies enabling mechanistic links between predictions and underlying traits and straightforward applications to other species and sites.

Monday, February 22, 2016 - 04:00 PM - 06:00 PM

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Poster Hall

Posted on February 22, 2016 .

New Article: Near-island biological hotspots in barren ocean basins

In an article published today in Nature Communications, we explore the extent and possible controls behind the "island mass effect" (productivity enhancements around islands).  The article is a collaboration among National Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationUniversity of Hawaiʻi at MānoaNational Geographic SocietyScripps Institution of Oceanography and Bangor University.

Posted on February 16, 2016 .

Now Published: Adult and Offspring Size in the Ocean

Our article:

Neuheimer, A.B.*, M. Hartvig, J. Heuschele, S. Hylander, T. Kiørboe, K.H. Olsson, J. Sainmont, and K.H. Andersen. 2015. Adult and offspring size in the ocean over 17 orders of magnitude follows two life history strategies. Ecology 96:3303–3311.

is now in publication format and available here.

Posted on January 11, 2016 .

Now Published: Characteristic Sizes of Life in the Oceans, from Bacteria to Whales

Our article:

K.H. Andersen, T. Berge, R.J. Gonçalves, M. Hartvig, J. Heuschele, S. Hylander, N.S. Jacobsen, C. Lindemann, E.A. Martens, A.B. Neuheimer*, K. Olsson, A. Palacz, F. Prowe, J. Sainmont, S.J. Traving, A.W. Visser, N. Wadhwa, and T. Kiørboe. 2016. Characteristic Sizes of Life in the Oceans, from Bacteria to Whales. Annu. Rev. Mar. Sci. 8:3.1-3.25. 

is now in publication format and available here.

Posted on January 11, 2016 .